Foundational outcomes assessment, part one

For the 2018-2019 academic year, ICaP has two extensive assessment projects underway. First, we are continuing our own programmatic assessment based on the external review completed by the Council of Writing Program Administrators’ Consultant-Evaluator Service in 2017. ICaP instructors will recognize this as our common assignment initiative. We’re currently scheduling two program-wide norm, read, and rate sessions this semester which will allow us to finalize (a) the selection of the common assignment to be implemented in all ICaP courses in AY19–20 and beyond, and (b) a comprehensive assessment plan which will include both short- and long-term measurements of  ICaP’s effectiveness.

Second, we are completing an assessment of English 106 and 108 focusing on their role in Purdue’s Undergraduate Core Curriculum (UCC) Foundational Outcomes, specifically written communication and information literacy. This assessment draws on the direct measurement of student writing ICaP instructors are supporting through our norm, read, and rate sessions, and adds background to showcase how ICaP policies like syllabus review, as well as our assessment efforts, ensure we meet and exceed Purdue’s UCC Foundational Outcomes.

These two assessment projects overlap in many ways, so we are sharing the preliminary report we’ve written for the Foundational Outcomes assessment for the Office of Institutional Research, Assessment and Effectiveness. We’ve published some of the appendices already, but those new to ICaP may be interested in them.

In a follow-up report, ICaP will provide the additional data requested for the foundational outcomes assessment.

My staff and I would like to take this opportunity to thank the student workers, instructors, and administrators who have helped us with these assessment efforts. Without our “grassroots curricular assessment model” (Conti, LaMance, and Miller-Cochran, 2017), our assessment efforts would not have been as rich or as rewarding as they are now. And I would like to highlight Derek Sherman’s work as Assessment Research Coordinator: he’s built on previous efforts extremely well, and I’m looking forward to our next steps.

Attachments: Foundational outcomes assessment preliminary report (as PDF, 284kb) and appendices (as a single PDF, 5.9mb, and also as separate PDFs).

Data science learning community

English instructors Michelle McMullin, Amanda Smith, & Ane Costa are instructors in the “Engineeering in the World of Data” learning community. Their classes recently met Purdue basketball coach Matt Painter and learned about the data analytics used by the coaching and recruiting staff.

Purdue Head Men’s Basketball Coach Matt Painter poses with the instructors and students in the “Engineering of the World of Data” learning community in Mackey Arena. Photo courtesy of Teresa Walker, Purdue School of Engineering Education.

The learning community is a partnership between First Year Engineering, Purdue Libraries, and Introductory Composition. Read more on the Purdue Libraries weblog.

Spring 2019 syllabus prep materials ready

Everything instructors need for spring syllabus preparation is now ready. We’ve made no changes to common assignment instructor guides, and we’ll be using the same syllabus review checklist from the fall. Remember, all ICaP courses must include one of these five common assignments in Spring 2019. (For those teaching online 106, English 106-Y, we’ve already shared materials by email.)

Please use the checklist in the construction of your syllabus to ensure you’ve included all the necessary details. If you get stuck, check Linda Haynes’ syllabus template, developed last fall. (Again—no changes.) This template, based on materials given to new instructors, offers everyone a second way to check their syllabi and provides robust examples of policies and possibilities. Not sure how to frame something? Check the template for examples.

There are two changes instructors should keep in mind, however:

First, instead of emailing syllabi to Dilger, we’ll ask you to fill out this Qualtrics form, which allows you to submit multiple syllabi at once (if necessary). We think this will make processing syllabi easier for us.

The second change is a required addition for your calendars. In Spring 2019, we will be asking all ICAP instructors to participate in two program-wide assessment norming, reading, and rating sessions. We will have sessions both before and after Spring Break, with multiple time slots to minimize schedule conflicts.

  • Mon Feb 25, 12:30p to 3:00p
  • Thu Feb 28, 9:00a to 11:30a
  • Fri Mar 01, 10:30a to 2:00p
  • Tue Apr 02, 9:00a to 11:30a
  • Wed Apr 03, 2:30p to 5:00p

Please plan to attend at least two of these five sessions. If necessary, you may cancel classes to facilitate the time needed to participate. We will share the locations and specifics at Convocation (including some incentives for participation). For now, please make the appropriate plans in your course calendars.

Need something else? Let us know. We welcome instructor feedback and continued suggestions for resources which can support teaching.

Fall 2018 common assignments ready

Our second generation of common assignment pilots are ready to go! Remember, all ICaP courses must include one of these five common assignments in Fall 2018 (excepting online 106, English 106-Y, which draws from a different set particular to those courses).

We’ve made a few updates based on instructor feedback and the reading and rating sessions completed in spring and summer:

  1. We are dropping the reading annotations assignment from this semester’s pilot.
  2. The literature review has been replaced by a research-based essay.
  3. The email assignment has been adjusted to require two different emails to two entirely different recipients (and has been further adjusted for content).
  4. The information literacy pre/post test assignment has not changed.

We’ve updated the common assignments page accordingly. All the new instructor guides have been adjusted to streamline the assignments for assessing program outcomes. The instructor guides also now include the rubrics used for assessment so instructors may better see how these common assignments are being used to assess the program. Each pilot guide still includes resources and ideas for how to incorporate the assignment into your course.

We hope the changes make both assignments and instructional guides more clear for instructors. At Convocation, we’ll say a bit about the assessment data which supported these changes, and dedicate time to breakout groups so instructors working on common assignments can get assistance, share materials, and make plans for the semester. As always, if you need assistance developing your syllabus or integrating a pilot assignment into your assignment sequence, reach out—the ICaP support staff is happy to help.

I want to thank Carrie Grant, Alisha Karabinus, Daniel Ernst, and Derek Sherman for their help finalizing this second generation of pilots. I’m also grateful to everyone who helped us develop the assignments or participated in the first pilot in Spring 2018: Bianca Batti, Mac Boyle, Elizabeth Geib, Patrick Hoburg, Mitchell Jacobs, Amanda Leary, Alex Long, Eugie Ruiz, Margaret Sheble, Phuong Tran, and Sharry Vahed.

Visiting instructor positions (updated)

Visiting clinical instructors for Introductory Composition
Department of English, Purdue University

Update, July 25: We have filled all positions. Thank you for your interest.

The Department of English at Purdue University is seeking visiting clinical instructors to teach Purdue’s first-year writing courses for Introductory Composition in Fall 2018 and Spring 2019. Courses may include mainstream versions of English 106 and English 108, as well as specialized sections that involve learning communities or service learning and community engagement. Load is seven courses for the year (likely 3/4). This Visiting Instructor of English position is a one-year appointment for the 2018-2019 academic year, beginning August 2018.

Salary is $40,000 for the academic year. This is a full-time, temporary position that includes benefits.

Qualifications

Minimum of a Master’s degree in English, Communication, or related discipline. PhD preferred. Experience teaching Introductory Composition at the college level.

Application Process

Email a letter of application, CV or résumé, and the names of at least three professional references to:

Dr. Bradley Dilger
dilger@purdue.edu
309-259-0328

Director, Introductory Composition at Purdue
Department of English, Purdue University
500 Oval Drive
West Lafayette, IN 47907

Review of complete application files will begin immediately and continue until all positions are filled.  As of July 25, all positions have been filled.

Questions to Dilger welcome. All applications will be acknowledged.

Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, and veterans are encouraged to apply. Qualified applicants are considered for employment without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry, genetic information, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, or status as a veteran.

(Download a PDF version of this announcement.)

ICaP Advisor’s Guide 2018–19 Published

We’ve published the 2018–19 edition of the Introductory Composition Advisor’s Guide. Here are the key changes from last year, as described by Assistant Director Linda Haynes:

  1. The 2018-19 manual’s reorganization and revisions are my attempt to make it easier to find the information you are looking for. I’ve consolidated some repeated material and tried to make the table of contents more clear.
  2. I’ve tried to clarify the differences between English 10600 and 10800 so that you can encourage your students to consider English 108. We no longer have an SAT/ACT score guideline for registration, which is rarely reflective of students’ writing abilities; instead we’d like to base placement on students’ sense of self-regulation and self-efficacy. Please allow students to use the Self-Placement Guidelines in Appendices A and B.
  3. Composition Requirements by College have been removed from the ICaP Advisor’s Guide. Composition requirements have become complicated enough that I would rather direct advisors to one another’s advising offices for the most updated and accurate requirements than publish outdated or incorrect information.

Our thanks to Ms. Haynes for the research and networking necessary to update the Guide. The 2017–18 Guide will remain available on our web site.

We welcome your questions about ICaP courses any time.

We’re hiring adjuncts (updated)

Limited-Term Lecturers for Introductory Composition
Department of English, Purdue University

Update 7/25: We are still taking applications, but do not expect to hire additional staff at this time.

The Department of English at Purdue University is seeking limited term lecturers (adjuncts) to teach Purdue’s first year writing courses for Introductory Composition in Fall 2018 and possibly Spring 2019. Courses include mainstream versions of English 106 and English 108, and specialized sections which involve learning communities or service-learning and community engagement. Fall orientation begins August 9, 2018. Courses begin August 20, 2018 and run to December 15, 2018.

Salary starting at $4,500 per four-credit section, but no benefits.

Qualifications

Minimum of a Master’s degree in English, Communication, or related discipline. Experience teaching Introductory Composition at the college level.

Application Process

Email a letter of application, CV or résumé, and at least three professional references to:

Dr. Bradley Dilger
dilger@purdue.edu
309-259-0328

Director, Introductory Composition at Purdue
Department of English, Purdue University
500 Oval Drive
West Lafayette, IN 47907

Review of complete application files will begin immediately and continue until all positions are filled. As of July 25, we are still taking applications, but do not expect to hire additional staff at this time.

Questions to Dilger welcome. All applications will be acknowledged.

Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, and veterans are encouraged to apply. Qualified applicants are considered for employment without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry, genetic information, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, or status as a veteran.

Download a PDF version of this announcement.

Update on common assignment pilots

We are continuing our initiative to use assessment data to refine our curriculum and learn more about the success of our approaches to teaching English 106 and 108. Last Thursday, we held our second reading and rating session for common assignment pilots. This was the second reading and rating session led by ICaP assessment research coordinator Daniel Ernst, following a similar event working with a professional emails assignment.

We began by discussing the rubrics used to rate the rhetorical analysis assignments under consideration, and isolating potential issues for discussion. We then read and rated four assignments, discussing the results each time, helping everyone think about the rubrics similarly and also giving us ways to refine the rubrics on the long term. Readers then spent about an hour rating assignments, with each receiving at least two readings.

After considering the results of these reading and rating sessions and instructor feedback on the pilots, we’ve decided on the following process for AY2018–19:

  1. We will have a second generation of multiple pilots in Fall 2018. All ICaP instructors will participate by selecting common assignments, implementing them, submitting data for assessment, and participating in both reading/rating sessions and other measurements.
  2. We will use the same six assignments as in Spring 2018, but assignment materials themselves will be updated to reflect what we’ve learned from our pilots. Requirements for each assignment will be released by July.
  3. We will ask that instructors follow the templates as closely as possible. Assignment materials will describe permissible modifications (e.g. selecting texts or changing timing of deliverables).
  4. Assignments must be graded and assigned points. This helps ensure students do their best work. Individual instructors will determine how the common assignments are integrated into their course assignment sequences and grading structures.
  5. Rubrics will be provided for each assignment. Instructors can customize the format of the rubric to fit with the rest of their course (ie. point values, rating scales, etc.), and may add additional assessment criteria, but all common assignment rubric criteria must be represented in the customization.

The pilots have already been very successful in helping us understand how to balance the needs of syllabus approaches with the overall purpose of the common assignment: ensuring we have a data set from each semester which can be evaluated against ICaP outcomes and in comparison to other semesters. We have some more ideas about Fall processes which we’ll be sharing soon — not to mention the results from the assessments themselves.

We are grateful for the ICaP instructors who have been involved with this work since the beginning and we hope the strong participation will continue. Thank you to our readers: Parva Panahi, Allegra Smith, Amanda Leary, Ingrid Pierce, Mac Boyle, Deena Varner, Libby Chernouski, Julia Smith, and Joe Forte. Thanks as well to the many instructors who are participating in the pilots and focus groups, and to Daniel, Carrie Grant, and April Pickens for preparation, data processing, and continuing analysis.

ICaP Showcase Winners, 2017–2018

Bailey Galema’s presentation for her creative project, “The First One”

Thank you to all of the students and instructors who presented at the 2018 Writing Showcase! We’re pleased to announce our award winners:

Student awards

Best Remediation to Presentation Design
Claire Bailey, “The Impact of the Work Environment on Employees”
Irwin Weiser, Instructor

Best Multimedia Project
Sam Conkle, “Purdue Half Marathon Review”
Lauren Mallett, Instructor

Best Primary Research
Taryn Coyle, “The Benefits and Feasibility of Implementing an Open-Interaction Model at Natalie’s Second Chance Dog Shelter”
Joe Forte, Instructor

Best Visualization of Research
Felix Fernandez, “Artificial Intelligence: Humanity’s Most Powerful Tool”
Ashley Matney, Instructor

Best Creative Project
Bailey Galema, “The First One”
Daye Phillipo, Instructor

People’s Choice
Amy Santos, “Ally Politics in Eco-Feminism: Activism without Cooption”
Victoria Ruiz, Instructor

Instructor awards

Most Innovative Syllabus Approach Application
Joshua Galat, “Engaging the Community: Composing Through Service Learning”

Best Application of Pedagogical Theory
Bianca Batti & Alisha Karabinus, “Composing Through Play”

Best Assignment Scaffolding Design
Derek Sherman, “Intersectional Research: Digging Deeper”

Thank you

Thank you to the Purdue students and ICaP instructors who shared their writing and digital media with us today. We really appreciate your hard work.

Thank you to the ICaP staff, especially Carrie Grant, Joy Kane, and April Pickens, for the logistical work which made Showcase a success.

We appreciate the support from the College of Liberal Arts, and our sponsoring publishers: Pearson, VanGriner, Bedford/St. Martin’s, Fountainhead, and W. W. Norton.

And thank you to our friends in Professional Writing, who’ve announced the awards for their Showcase too.