ICaP showcase to merge with Purdue Undergraduate Research Conference

Photo credit: Purdue Undergraduate Research Conference

Big news: we are merging the ICaP showcase with the Purdue Undergraduate Research Conference. This not only gives our students opportunities to present their work to larger crowds, but opens up new possibilities for accolades, awards, and recognition.

We’ll also now have two opportunities to participate if we want, as there is a fall exposition as well as the major conference in the spring. This year, our focus will be  the spring event, scheduled for April 9. Some of the participation process will stay the same—students will complete applications to participate, then present a research poster—but there are a few key changes you should be aware of:

  1. Instructors are no longer required to nominate students. Students must apply to enter.  Instructors can (and should!) encourage participation.
  2. All research posters must be formal, printed posters. No more science-fair style trifolds!
  3. Students must write a (brief) abstract to enter. These abstracts are included in a book encapsulating all submitted projects.
  4. Categories for entry have changed slightly. Students can now enter in multiple categories.

We are confident  this new partnership will benefit our students. They will be exposed to student research projects on a much broader scale, and have the chance to participate in something much larger as well.

So what does that mean for you and your students? If you are already teaching a research poster, encourage fall semester students with strong projects to apply for presentation at the spring conference. You and your students can get more information on our Undergraduate Research Showcase site, including resources for writing the abstract, and revising and printing posters. Get them registered! If you need help with any part of this process, ICaP staff is prepared to assist. We’d love to see a huge turnout. 

If you are not teaching a research poster, don’t despair! Any student project can be presented on a poster. Please see our resources for help in transforming a project.

Questions? Contact the ICaP staff.

Fall 2018 common assignments ready

Our second generation of common assignment pilots are ready to go! Remember, all ICaP courses must include one of these five common assignments in Fall 2018 (excepting online 106, English 106-Y, which draws from a different set particular to those courses).

We’ve made a few updates based on instructor feedback and the reading and rating sessions completed in spring and summer:

  1. We are dropping the reading annotations assignment from this semester’s pilot.
  2. The literature review has been replaced by a research-based essay.
  3. The email assignment has been adjusted to require two different emails to two entirely different recipients (and has been further adjusted for content).
  4. The information literacy pre/post test assignment has not changed.

We’ve updated the common assignments page accordingly. All the new instructor guides have been adjusted to streamline the assignments for assessing program outcomes. The instructor guides also now include the rubrics used for assessment so instructors may better see how these common assignments are being used to assess the program. Each pilot guide still includes resources and ideas for how to incorporate the assignment into your course.

We hope the changes make both assignments and instructional guides more clear for instructors. At Convocation, we’ll say a bit about the assessment data which supported these changes, and dedicate time to breakout groups so instructors working on common assignments can get assistance, share materials, and make plans for the semester. As always, if you need assistance developing your syllabus or integrating a pilot assignment into your assignment sequence, reach out—the ICaP support staff is happy to help.

I want to thank Carrie Grant, Alisha Karabinus, Daniel Ernst, and Derek Sherman for their help finalizing this second generation of pilots. I’m also grateful to everyone who helped us develop the assignments or participated in the first pilot in Spring 2018: Bianca Batti, Mac Boyle, Elizabeth Geib, Patrick Hoburg, Mitchell Jacobs, Amanda Leary, Alex Long, Eugie Ruiz, Margaret Sheble, Phuong Tran, and Sharry Vahed.

Updates to upcoming syllabus checklist for ICaP

In our continued efforts to improve the base syllabus requirements for use in English 106 and 108, and respond to student feedback about our courses, we have updated an important portion of this year’s syllabus checklist: the syllabus approach description. Rather than simply asking instructors to include a version of the official syllabus approach description, we are asking that new syllabi take that description a step further and include a statement on how the approach will be enacted for that specific course, and how assignments reflect the approach’s enactment. These simple additions offer a new level of clarity for students entering the composition classroom, and allow instructors a point of reflection on their course and assignment sequences.

Not only do these improved syllabus approach descriptions offer students a better understanding of the purpose of the syllabus approach, they are a professional development tool for our instructors. Explaining ICaP’s syllabus approach system can be difficult, especially in relation to how it impacts course design. A more robust description on the syllabus gives instructors a chance to think about those connections long before the necessity of explaining in an interview. Here’s an example (for a Digital Rhetorics syllabus):

During the course, we establish digital rhetorics as an umbrella term for the way in which we interact with information today, beginning with the professional email assignment (exploring a common digital genre) and technology literacy narrative, a prompt which requires self-exploration into connections to technology. This course does not aim to study digital rhetorics as a type of cultural studies separate from ourselves, but instead as the very grounding of our ability to find, interpret, and use information in the digital age. With more and more information being stored and created digitally, students need to develop a research literacy—skills fostered by our extended research project—that will help them not only understand these issues, but overcome and utilize them as well. This does not mean simply covering these concepts during class lectures and discussions, but rather putting these ideas into practice with the ways we write and design.

Guidelines will be available when the syllabus checklist goes out later this week, but if instructors have any questions, we will be happy to help develop this adjustment to syllabi.

Also new this semester: Linda Haynes has developed a syllabus template which integrates the checklist. This new version, based on the materials given to new instructors, offers instructors a second way to check their syllabus, and provides robust examples of policies and possibilities. Not sure how to frame something? Check the template for examples. The traditional syllabus checklist will also be available; this new template is meant to be a resource to help instructors build their own documents.

We welcome instructor feedback and continued suggestions for resources which can support teaching.

Visiting instructor positions (updated)

Visiting clinical instructors for Introductory Composition
Department of English, Purdue University

Update, July 25: We have filled all positions. Thank you for your interest.

The Department of English at Purdue University is seeking visiting clinical instructors to teach Purdue’s first-year writing courses for Introductory Composition in Fall 2018 and Spring 2019. Courses may include mainstream versions of English 106 and English 108, as well as specialized sections that involve learning communities or service learning and community engagement. Load is seven courses for the year (likely 3/4). This Visiting Instructor of English position is a one-year appointment for the 2018-2019 academic year, beginning August 2018.

Salary is $40,000 for the academic year. This is a full-time, temporary position that includes benefits.

Qualifications

Minimum of a Master’s degree in English, Communication, or related discipline. PhD preferred. Experience teaching Introductory Composition at the college level.

Application Process

Email a letter of application, CV or résumé, and the names of at least three professional references to:

Dr. Bradley Dilger
dilger@purdue.edu
309-259-0328

Director, Introductory Composition at Purdue
Department of English, Purdue University
500 Oval Drive
West Lafayette, IN 47907

Review of complete application files will begin immediately and continue until all positions are filled.  As of July 25, all positions have been filled.

Questions to Dilger welcome. All applications will be acknowledged.

Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, and veterans are encouraged to apply. Qualified applicants are considered for employment without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry, genetic information, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, or status as a veteran.

(Download a PDF version of this announcement.)

ICaP Advisor’s Guide 2018–19 Published

We’ve published the 2018–19 edition of the Introductory Composition Advisor’s Guide. Here are the key changes from last year, as described by Assistant Director Linda Haynes:

  1. The 2018-19 manual’s reorganization and revisions are my attempt to make it easier to find the information you are looking for. I’ve consolidated some repeated material and tried to make the table of contents more clear.
  2. I’ve tried to clarify the differences between English 10600 and 10800 so that you can encourage your students to consider English 108. We no longer have an SAT/ACT score guideline for registration, which is rarely reflective of students’ writing abilities; instead we’d like to base placement on students’ sense of self-regulation and self-efficacy. Please allow students to use the Self-Placement Guidelines in Appendices A and B.
  3. Composition Requirements by College have been removed from the ICaP Advisor’s Guide. Composition requirements have become complicated enough that I would rather direct advisors to one another’s advising offices for the most updated and accurate requirements than publish outdated or incorrect information.

Our thanks to Ms. Haynes for the research and networking necessary to update the Guide. The 2017–18 Guide will remain available on our web site.

We welcome your questions about ICaP courses any time.

We’re hiring adjuncts (updated)

Limited-Term Lecturers for Introductory Composition
Department of English, Purdue University

Update 7/25: We are still taking applications, but do not expect to hire additional staff at this time.

The Department of English at Purdue University is seeking limited term lecturers (adjuncts) to teach Purdue’s first year writing courses for Introductory Composition in Fall 2018 and possibly Spring 2019. Courses include mainstream versions of English 106 and English 108, and specialized sections which involve learning communities or service-learning and community engagement. Fall orientation begins August 9, 2018. Courses begin August 20, 2018 and run to December 15, 2018.

Salary starting at $4,500 per four-credit section, but no benefits.

Qualifications

Minimum of a Master’s degree in English, Communication, or related discipline. Experience teaching Introductory Composition at the college level.

Application Process

Email a letter of application, CV or résumé, and at least three professional references to:

Dr. Bradley Dilger
dilger@purdue.edu
309-259-0328

Director, Introductory Composition at Purdue
Department of English, Purdue University
500 Oval Drive
West Lafayette, IN 47907

Review of complete application files will begin immediately and continue until all positions are filled. As of July 25, we are still taking applications, but do not expect to hire additional staff at this time.

Questions to Dilger welcome. All applications will be acknowledged.

Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, and veterans are encouraged to apply. Qualified applicants are considered for employment without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry, genetic information, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, or status as a veteran.

Download a PDF version of this announcement.

ICaP Showcase Winners, 2017–2018

Bailey Galema’s presentation for her creative project, “The First One”

Thank you to all of the students and instructors who presented at the 2018 Writing Showcase! We’re pleased to announce our award winners:

Student awards

Best Remediation to Presentation Design
Claire Bailey, “The Impact of the Work Environment on Employees”
Irwin Weiser, Instructor

Best Multimedia Project
Sam Conkle, “Purdue Half Marathon Review”
Lauren Mallett, Instructor

Best Primary Research
Taryn Coyle, “The Benefits and Feasibility of Implementing an Open-Interaction Model at Natalie’s Second Chance Dog Shelter”
Joe Forte, Instructor

Best Visualization of Research
Felix Fernandez, “Artificial Intelligence: Humanity’s Most Powerful Tool”
Ashley Matney, Instructor

Best Creative Project
Bailey Galema, “The First One”
Daye Phillipo, Instructor

People’s Choice
Amy Santos, “Ally Politics in Eco-Feminism: Activism without Cooption”
Victoria Ruiz, Instructor

Instructor awards

Most Innovative Syllabus Approach Application
Joshua Galat, “Engaging the Community: Composing Through Service Learning”

Best Application of Pedagogical Theory
Bianca Batti & Alisha Karabinus, “Composing Through Play”

Best Assignment Scaffolding Design
Derek Sherman, “Intersectional Research: Digging Deeper”

Thank you

Thank you to the Purdue students and ICaP instructors who shared their writing and digital media with us today. We really appreciate your hard work.

Thank you to the ICaP staff, especially Carrie Grant, Joy Kane, and April Pickens, for the logistical work which made Showcase a success.

We appreciate the support from the College of Liberal Arts, and our sponsoring publishers: Pearson, VanGriner, Bedford/St. Martin’s, Fountainhead, and W. W. Norton.

And thank you to our friends in Professional Writing, who’ve announced the awards for their Showcase too.

Second CILMAR grant for Transculturation team

Congratulations to Rebekah Sims, Hadi Banat, Parva Panahi Lazarjani, and Phuong Tran (below, from left), the instructors leading the Transculturation research project in Introductory Composition. They were recently presented a second CILMAR Mini-Grant award of $2,000 to support their research in developing linked courses and curricula which support the growth of intercultural competence. Presenting the award (far left) is Dr. Dan Hirleman.

Well done!

Reaching Beyond the Classroom with English 108-S

Every semester, specialized sections of introductory composition take on the theme of “Engaging Public Discourse.” These accelerated courses ask students to think about public issues and community contexts beyond Purdue’s campus through community engagement.

English 108-S courses can take a number of formats: A class may partner with one community organization, developing projects to meet organizational needs. Students may individually volunteer in the community and write reflective projects related to their service. Assignments may ask students conduct research and take action on community-based issues. In each of these forms, community engagement encourages students’ civic participation and real world applications for learning.

If you are interested in community engagement or teaching 108-S:

ICaP is currently accepting applications to teach ENGL 108-S for Fall 2018. Instructors teaching the course will be required to enroll in English 680: Experiential Learning and Engagement in the fall as a seminar and practicum on community engagement pedagogy. If you think you may be interested in teaching English 108-S sometime in the future, we also encourage you to take this excellent course with Professor Bay.

To apply to teach English 108-S, send an application email to dilger@purdue.edu by Wednesday, March 21 addressing the following:

  1. Why you’d like to teach an service-learning/accelerated course
  2. Your background, experience, or interest in community engagement or community service
  3. Ideas you have about community partnerships or assignments you would be interested in developing for your 108-S course
  4. Whether you would be able to take English 680: Experiential Learning and Engagement in the fall, or have already taken it.

If you have any questions about teaching 108-S or the application process, please reach out to Carrie Grant, Assistant Director of Introductory Composition (grant34@purdue.edu) or Bradley Dilger, Director of Introductory Composition (dilger@purdue.edu).

Administrative position selections

We’re pleased to announce our Introductory Composition administrative staff for AY2018–19. Welcome to:

Assessment research coordinator
Derek Sherman
Assistant director
Alisha Karabinus
Assistant mentors
Rebekah Sims and Kylie Regan
Online course developer
Bianca Batti
Technology mentor
Dee McCormick (joining Patrick Love)

Our applicant pool was large and very experienced, so it was difficult to make these decisions. We are grateful to everyone who applied and interviewed with us.

Please join us in congratulating our new staff.